drawing kids art map image Dougie talking Dougie at a ruin

Learning Activities

A’ Lorg ar lorgan, the Discovery Trails project was an environmental learning activity at Sgoil Stafainn, Staffin Primary School in 2006/07 as part of Highland 2007. The Trust was awarded a grant from ‘Awards for All’. Nearly 50 pupils (all P3-7) were accompanied by teachers, different experts and an artist, Caroline Dear to explore several walks and sites of historical and natural interest in the Staffin area. These discovery trails were followed up with map making workshops. Each walk covered a particular specialist area and each map, a reflection of the walk, focused on a different area of map making (symbols, contours, language, personal experience, colour). The aim was to provide an introduction to the layers, both within the landscape and within maps. The pupils were introduced to using a number of different artistic skills and materials.

Please contact us if you are in the area. We can organise a guided walk, visit to Staffin Museum or fossil hunt. Further contact: Highland Council Rangers, Skye & Lochalsh, Tel. 01471 822905

Research

Staffin rarely fails to impress those who visit. On one level you might seek the reasons for its appeal in terms of the ‘assemblage’ of elements, e.g. the attractive blend of nature and scenery, history and human activity, and the changing light playing on a diverse and special landscape. At a more specific level there are the attractions of the individual elements, which make up that landscape and at an even more specialised level is the continued scientific fascination with the landscape and manifold questions it generates.

However, this is a landscape for which there is already a considerable body of knowledge in place, the sheer volume in itself being a measure of its ‘special’ qualities. The Feasibility Study (2003) for Ceumannan provided a bibliography of the books, papers and articles relating to knowledge and understanding of the natural aspects of this landscape.

Ceumannan has integrated Staffin’s unique assemblage of natural and heritage elements to reveal a more multi-faceted and rounded approach to an understanding of the area. We should also provide a mechanism by which knowledge of and access to nature and heritage resources might be enhanced through studies which might in turn expand understanding of these resources. A good example of what is meant is the recent expansion of information about the ‘dinosaur’ record which are rapidly establishing the reputation of East Trotternish as the ‘Dinosaur capital’ of Scotland.

In June 2006 we hosted a field trip from Oxford College of Emory University, USA. IS YOUR OWN ORGANISATION AWARE OF THE OUTSTANDING POTENTIAL OF STAFFIN AS A DESTINATION FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND FIELDWORK? WOULD YOU BE INTERESTED IN NEGOTIATING WITH STAFFIN COMMUNITY TRUST TO INITIATE INTER-DISCIPLINARY OR GEOLOGICAL STUDIES, FOR EXAMPLE?

We would be most pleased to be of assistance. Feel free to contact us to discuss the possibilities.