An Lethallt

You can cross the main road and follow The Diatomite Road until you reach Loch Cuithir. At one time algae clay (diatomite) was sourced from here for industrial use. Feel the isolation of the loch under the cliffs of the Trotternish Ridge. Discover how man has carved this landscape. Look out for Seanntalamh, one of Skyes deserted / cleared villages, and the old patterns of lazybeds (agricultural strips) and peat-cutting. If you feel the connection between soil and soul on The Diatomite Road, why not take the time to also explore Brothers Point nearby, or the Brogaig site beneath the Quiraing?

Seo beagan earrannan bhon ran ainmeil le Miri Mhr nan ran (1821 1898). Sgrobh i an t-ran s didh dha na croitearan buaidh a thoirt air na h-uachdarain anns an str airson feurachadh dhan cuid stoc air bruachan Beinn L. Gheibh sibh barrachd fiosrachaidh mu chroitearan Bhaltois aig lrach Rubha nam Brithrean.

HAVE YOU NOTICED THE PEATBANKS IN THE LANDSCAPE?

One crofter recalls:

"The cutting and drying of peat in the summer was a very important aspect of our lives. Although work-intensive, it was a free source of fuel.
Most townships had close access to their allocated peatbog.
Other crofters - for example in the township of Digg - had to walk two miles to the Quiraing. When my parents got married in 1952, it was the first year that the family used a tractor to take the peats home. On seeing the peat-laden tractor approaching the house, my granny said, "Is iomadh rud a ch an duine a bhios fada be"
(The long-lived person will witness many changes)."

ISNT IT A SHAME THAT MODERNITY IS BURNING OUT MANY OF THESE OLD CUSTOMS?

peat cutting
gaelic poem